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Thursday, June 15, 2017


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This week in USAAA WeeklyNews Special Edition

- 5 Father’s Day Lessons For Every Parent From An Autism Dad
- Involved Fathers Get Results
- Dads Can Make a Difference!
- The USAAA 12th Annual World Conference - Register Now


article
5 Father's Day Lessons For Every Parent From An Autism Dad

by Lara Stolman, HuffPost Contributor

When I think about the great fathers that I know, Coach Mike McQuay is right there at the top of the list. I’ve had the privilege of closely observing Coach Mike for a few years now because he volunteers as a coach for the Jersey Hammerheads, the competitive swim team of teens on the autism spectrum that is the subject of my feature documentary film, "Swim Team."

Here are my top five favorite quotes of Coach Mike’s from "Swim Team" that embody his winning approach to fatherhood:

1. "You have to have patience."
2. "Will makes skill."
3. "We’re not here to sugarcoat or hide who he is."
4. "You can’t give up on your child."
5. “Mom and Dad’s not always gonna be with you.”

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Lara Stolman is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and television producer. Her work has appeared on NBC, MSNBC, AMC, VH-1 and The New York Times' website. Lara produced and directed "Swim Team," a feature documentary chronicling the rise of a competitive swim team made up of diverse teenagers on the autism spectrum.The Oregon Premiere of "Swim Team" will be featured at 7:00 pm, August 24, at the USAAA 12th Annual World Conference and Expo in Portland, Oregon, August 24-27, 2017. Following the film, there will be a Q&A with Lara Stolman. Conference attendees will get a sneak preview of the film before its premiere on PBS' award-winning nonfiction showcase POV.

"It’s incredible to see how these kids blossom with a coach who has the patience to give them a chance. All kids need the patience of their parents as they explore the world, test their limits and stretch their wings." - Coach Mike McQuay from the feature documentary film, "Swim Team."

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article
Involved Fathers Get Results

Author: Robert Naseef, Ph.D.

Male role models are important for children, and boys and girls growing up on the autism spectrum are no exception. Fathers are more involved than ever, and research backs up their impact on children. However, when a child has autism there are often steep challenges for the typical male parent. Let’s take a look at the potential for growth and how to overcome the barriers that autism presents.

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A nationally representative survey of over 10,000 men found that most American fathers report being heavily involved in hands-on parenting.

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Dads Can Make a Difference! Getting Dads of Children with Autism Involved in Intervention

Moms and dads are different. When it comes to our kids, we have different ways of talking, playing, and interacting. I witness this on a daily basis in my own home. Just last night at dinner time I was trying to get everyone to the table, but no one was listening because my husband and young son were wrestling on the couch, while my other son was trying to get in on the action. They were all laughing hysterically and I stood there watching them and smiling, like an observer from another planet.

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by involving only mothers in intervention, we are missing out on fathers’ unique strengths.

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Register Now for the USAAA 12th Annual World Conference & Expo in Portland, Oregon, August 25-27, 2017

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