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US Autism & Asperger Association

October 24, 2014

Welcome to US Autism & Asperger Association WeeklyNews, an email newsletter that addresses a range of topics on autism, Asperger Syndrome, PDD, and other related disorders.

Please do not reply to this email as we are not able to respond to messages sent to this address. Contact us at www.usautism.org.


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The Implications of Low Cholesterol in Depression and Suicide

by James M. Greenblatt, M.D.

For the last quarter century, we have been told that cholesterol is dangerous for our health and were advised to avoid it in order to live a healthier life. However, cholesterol is essential in maintaining good mental health. The brain is the most cholesterol-rich organ in the body, and depriving the brain of essential fatty acids and cholesterol can lead to detrimental health problems. Lower levels of cholesterol in the blood are associated with a heightened risk of developing major depressive disorder, as well as an increased risk of death from suicide. A study published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research found that depressed men with low total cholesterol levels (less than 165 milligrams per deciliter [mg/dL]) were seven times more likely to die prematurely from unnatural causes such as suicide and accidents. FULL ARTICLE

After reviewing 72 different studies, researchers did not find that people who ate higher levels of saturated fat had more heart disease than those who ate less. Researchers came to the conclusion that instead of avoiding fats, which are essential to maintaining brain health, scientists are identifying the real villains as sugar and highly processed foods.

Dr. James M. Greenblatt is the Chief Medical Officer at Walden Behavioral Care in Waltham, Massachusetts. He is also a clinical faculty member at Tufts Medical School, Department of Psychiatry. He is the author of Answers to Anorexia, The Breakthrough Depression Solution, and Answers to Appetite Control.

FULL ARTICLE
Access to USAAA Newsletter Archive 2005 - 2014


To Siri, With Love
How One Boy With Autism Became BFF with Apple's Siri

by Judith Newman

Just how bad a mother am I? I wondered, as I watched my 13-year-old son deep in conversation with Siri. Gus has autism, and Siri, Apple's "intelligent personal assistant" on the iPhone, is currently his BFF. Obsessed with weather formations, Gus had spent the hour parsing the difference between isolated and scattered thunderstorms - an hour in which, thank God, I didn't have to discuss them. After a while I heard this:

Gus: "You’re a really nice computer."

Siri: "It’s nice to be appreciated."
FULL ARTICLE

Gus is hardly alone in his Siri love. For children like Gus who love to chatter but don't quite understand the rules of the game, Siri is a nonjudgmental friend and teacher.

FULL ARTICLE
Access to USAAA Newsletter Archive 2005 - 2014


Cognition, Sensory Processing and Behavior

An excerpt from Marlo P. Thurman's presentation, "The Continuums of Autism: Cognition, Sensory Processing and Behavior", on September 5, 2014 at the USAAA World Conference in Kansas City, Missouri, is posted on the USAAA YouTube Channel. The 6:47 minute video focuses on sensory processing and that our sensory system speaks through our behaviors.

View video

"We're no longer using our cognitive energy to manage the dynamics of the people around us."

"It's not only our systems can be in different places, but our systems can be in different places at different times."

View video
Access to USAAA Newsletter Archive 2005 - 2014


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In this issue:

logoHealth News
The Implications of Low Cholesterol in Depression and Suicide

logoEducation News
To Siri, With Love
How One Boy With Autism Became BFF with Apple's Siri

Cognition, Sensory Processing and Behavior


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