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US Autism & Asperger Association

October 30, 2013

Welcome to USAAA WeeklyNews, an email newsletter that addresses a range of topics on autism, Asperger Syndrome, PDD, and other related disorders.

Please do not reply to this email as we are not able to respond to messages sent to this address. Contact us at www.usautism.org or for comments to the articles, visit the our blog.


Living with autism

shore and sarikahan

Stephen M. Shore, EdD - "The autism bomb hits the mark, and life is never the same again for the person on the autism spectrum or for the family members, educators, doctors and others who provide support. The first questions that bubbles up are: "What should I do? "What is the best intervention for my child with autism?" During the mid-1960s there were very few choices for a child who became non-verbal, had tantrums and very little body to environmental awareness. At that time an autism diagnosis was considered as a sentence to a life of dependency with either family members or in an institution. Perhaps, with luck and a lot of hard work, employment in a sheltered workshop was a possibility." More...

"At that time [mid-1960's] an autism diagnosis was considered as a sentence to a life of dependency with either family members or in an institution. Perhaps, with luck and a lot of hard work, employment in a sheltered workshop was a possibility. - Stephen M. Shore, EdD, Professor, Adelphi University

Isabelle Sarikahan - "I had a hard time graduating. The university kicked me out and said you have too many credits and to go out into the world now and see what's out there. I took a job at the University kind of doing menial laboratory work and then everyone told me I had to start applying for jobs. That was a really steep learning curve. Once you get and learn your education and learn your passion, how do you jump all those little hoops to get through the interviews to get through the things saying that I may not have the best social skills, I may not have the best ability to do teamwork with all the other individuals there, but really if you get me on board to your little company or place, I'm going to really succeed because I have a lot of knowledge and passion in certain areas and you'll forgive me for doing a few social blunders here and there. I had a lot of people pull my hands through that and I probably went through 50 or 60 interviews before I really understood the process of how to say stuff, how I am to present myself and the whole aspect of trying to sell yourself to get a job. If we can instill that and better explain that to autistic people we can exploit those things and find ourselves to jump into the work world." More...

"I had a lot of people pull my hands through that and I probably went through 50 or 60 interviews before I really understood the process of how to say stuff, how I am to present myself and the whole aspect of trying to sell yourself to get a job." - Isabelle Sarikahan

FULL STORY
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Woman breaks through Asperger's syndrome with geocaching

by Texas Parks and Wildlife
KUVE abc

image to video linkIt can be a debilitating health disorder for many people. Asperger syndrome, part of the autism spectrum, primarily affects one's social life.

One woman discovered a way to break through her disorder through Geocaching, a sort of treasure hunt in the outdoors using just a smart phone or GPS device. Since she got started in 2010, Toni has found more than 7,000 caches. FULL STORY

"You don't understand people and people don't understand you. That has led me to have kind of a rather secluded life. I just didn't kind of fit in anywhere. And so it was with geocaching that I was able to get out in the world."

FULL STORY
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helth news logo

As the EU Launches Shocking Fructose Health Claim Label, Oreos Are Found to Be as Addictive as Cocaine

By Dr. Mercola

image to video linkWhen you eat refined processed sugars, they trigger production of your brain's natural opioid -- a key ingredient in the addiction process. Your brain essentially becomes addicted to stimulating the release of its own opioids as it would to morphine or heroin.

"Our research supports the theory that high-fat/ high-sugar foods stimulate the brain in the same way that drugs do. It may explain why some people can't resist these foods despite the fact that they know they are bad for them." - Professor Schroeder

This addictive nature of sugar and processed food has again been confirmed by a psychology professor and a team of students at the College of Connecticut, who showed that Oreo cookies are just as addictive as cocaine or morphine.

The study, which was designed to investigate the potential addictiveness of high-fat/high-sugar foods, also found that eating Oreos activated more neurons in the rat brain's pleasure center than exposure to illicit drugs did. FULL STORY

"I do not agree with the comment that everything that is considered high-fat is bad for you. Oreo cookies and virtually every other processed snack are bad because they use highly processed omega-6 vegetable oils, the wrong type of fat. However it is possible to make a healthy high-fat snack using oils like coconut oil." - Dr. Mercola

FULL STORY
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Student continues college despite struggles with Asperger's, finances

By Nelson Garcia, 9 News

image and link to videoLITTLETON [CO]- When Jordan Vigil started high school, the idea of going to college was not even a possibility. He was struggling so much in school he wanted to drop out. The worst part, he didn't even know why.

"I would frequently have meltdowns where I wouldn't be able to do my work at all," Jordan Vigil said. "There were times when I had to be escorted out of the room."

"I would frequently have meltdowns where I wouldn't be able to do my work at all," Jordan Vigil said. "There were times when I had to be escorted out of the room."

His parents Toby and Heidi Vigil were worried because on the surface, it didn't appear there was anything wrong with Jordan. But, he certainly struggled in social situations with other students. FULL STORY


For information on colleges and college planning, click here.

For information on college scholarships and financial aid, click here.


FULL STORY
To leave comments, go to our Blog.
Access to USAAA Newsletter Archive 2005 - 2013


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logoIn this issue:
Living with autism

Woman breaks through Asperger's syndrome with geocaching

logoHealth News
As the EU Launches Shocking Fructose Health Claim Label, Oreos Are Found to Be as Addictive as Cocaine

logoEducation News
Student continues college despite struggles with Asperger's, finances

Information on colleges and college planning

Information on college scholarships and financial aid


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