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US Autism & Asperger Association

June 7, 2013

Welcome to USAAA WeeklyNews, an email newsletter that addresses a range of topics on Autism, Asperger's Syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorders.

Please do not reply to this email as we are not able to respond to messages sent to this address. Contact us at www.usautism.org or for comments to the articles, visit the our blog.


How high-tech jobs could solve the autism unemployment crisis
Some adults on the autism spectrum are uniquely suited for tech jobs - and the industry is starting to take notice

By Katie Drummond, The Verge

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Since getting his first Game Boy at five years old, Aaron Winston knew he wanted to work in the gaming industry. But as he got older, the prospect seemed less and less likely: Winston, who is autistic, enrolled in community college but never made it to his first day of classes. "The social environment scared me off," he told The Verge." I was too nervous."

Three years later, however, Winston is thriving as a staff programmer at the nonPareil Institute in Dallas, TX. His first game, Space Ape, is available on iOS and Android, and Winston now looks forward to a future in the industry. "This is the right environment for me, and I want to stay at nonPareil for years," he said. "They gave me a career." Read the Story

"The institute was born out of two parents worrying about their kids."

"They gave me a career."

Read the Story
To leave comments, go to our Blog.
Access to USAAA Newsletter Archive 2005 - 2013


Study finds autism, ADHD often occur together

Written by Brenda Goodman, HealthDay

boy blockesAlmost 30 percent of young children with autism also show signs of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, a rate that's three times higher than it is in the general population, a new study shows.

"We don't know the cause for ADHD in most cases. We don't know the cause of autism in most cases. It's not surprising that something that's going to affect the brain and cause one developmental outcome may also cause a second developmental outcome," said Dr. Andrew Adesman, chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children's Medical Center in Lake Success, N.Y. He was not involved in the study. Read the Story

All the children who had both problems together were boys. Boys have higher rates of autism and ADHD than girls, research shows.

Read the Story
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Access to USAAA Newsletter Archive 2005 - 2013


A father who saw untapped forces in his son's autism

By Emma Jacobs

fatherWhen Thorkil Sonne's son Lars was diagnosed with autism at the age of two and a half in 1999, the last thing the chief technology officer expected was a career change. "I was a happy employee. I was happy to be employed by a big company," he says.

Today, the 52-year-old who once oversaw technology at a spin-off of TDC, Denmark's largest telecoms company, has sold his family home - after remortgaging it several times - and is relocating to the US state of Delaware. It is all part of his mission to persuade high-tech companies of the merits of employing autistic workers.

Read the Story

Instead, they talked to other parents of autistic children. Their lives brightened. "I didn't think you could tell jokes any more because life seemed so serious. Parents can see so much in their kids that others cannot. Autistic people are very different depending on whether they are in or outside of their comfort zone."

Read the Story
To leave comments, go to our Blog.
Access to USAAA Newsletter Archive 2005 - 2013


We should expand opportunities for people with autism

by Teresa Avery, Autism Delaware

jobs newspaperA recent News Journal article focused on a new partnership between CAI, an international IT company with a strong presence in Delaware, and Specialisterne, an organization that helps people with autism match their skills to jobs mainly at technology firms in the corporate sector. The partnership was forged with the support of Delaware Gov. Jack Markell and Department of Health and Social Services Secretary Rita Landgraf.

Autism Delaware applauds this effort and looks forward with excitement to working with all involved to create more opportunities for employment for individuals with all types of autism spectrum disorders. Read the Story

Employing people with autism and other disabilities is an important, achievable goal.

Read the Story
To leave comments, go to our Blog.
Access to USAAA Newsletter Archive 2005 - 2013


conference news update

USAAA 2013 World Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 15-18

EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION ENDS JUNE 15

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These are some of the 30+ experts who have the solutions: Temple Grandin, PhD, one of the most accomplished adults with autism in the world; Martha Herbert, MD, PhD, a Harvard professor who is on the cutting edge of autism research; Tim Page, DFA, a Pulitzer Prize winner and professor, who is grateful to have a diagnosis; Stephen M. Shore, EdD, a world renowned lecturer who overcame his autism challenges and is now a professor of special education; Phillip C. DeMio, MD, a father and a nationally recognized expert physician who has treated thousands of persons with ASD; Elaine Hall, a mother who is making miracles for children, teenagers, and adults.

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speakers

On August 15 - 18, the US Autism & Asperger Association (USAAA) launches its 2013 Annual World Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah at the Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel and Convention Center. Over 35 of the world's most respected experts will discuss New Research, Treatment Modalities, Resources, and Avenues for Advocacy. After three days, you will leave the conference armed with tools of practical protocols, valuable hope, and new resources for support for your child, family member, patient, friend, student, or yourself.

Our speakers and panelists include physicians, behaviorists, educators, researchers, speech pathologists, occupational therapists, developmental specialists, psychologists, social workers, scientists, nutritionists, siblings, teachers, self advocates, parents, education consultants, plus more. USAAA features World Premiere presentations.

Dr. Temple Grandin, PhD, one of the most accomplished and well-known adults with autism in the world, will keynote the opening session on Friday morning, August 16 and there will be an exclusive special "One on One" with Temple. Dr. Grandin ranked 31st on Time Magazine's list of the most influential people of 2010 in the world. Dr. Grandin's fascinating life was brought to the screen in the HBO production full-length film, Temple Grandin, which received seven Emmy awards in 2010. Dr. Grandin works as a Professor of Animal Sciences at Colorado State University.

Continuing education will be offered throughout the conference.

View the schedule.

REGISTER NOW for the conference!

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In this issue:

How high-tech jobs could solve the autism unemployment crisis

Study finds autism, ADHD often occur together

A father who saw untapped forces in his son's autism

We should expand opportunities for people with autism

logoCONFERENCE NEWS UPDATE
The Autism Event That Will Change Your Life. Forever.


Early Bird registration
ends June 15th.

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US Autism & Asperger Association hosts the USAAA 2013 World Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, August 15-18.

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Schedule

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