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US Autism & Asperger Association
August 15, 2011

Welcome to USAAA WeeklyNews, an email newsletter that addresses a range of topics on Autism Spectrum Disorders including Asperger's Syndrome.


Seattle Public Schools Approve USAAA Conference for Continuing Education

seattle public schools logoThe US Autism & Asperger Association World Conference has been approved by Seattle Public Schools and participants are eligible to earn up to "21" clock hours during the program October 27-30.

"This is a tremendous opportunity for teachers, administrators, and all staff to attend the 2011 event featuring the top names in autism," said Lawrence P. Kaplan, PhD, founder of USAAA. The conference includes Keynote Speaker Eustacia Cutler, playwright, author and mother of Temple Grandin; Stephen M. Shore, EdD, world-renowned lecturer and professor who overcame his autism challenges; presentations from three of the most respected physicians in the autism community worldwide, Dr. Phillip C. DeMio, Dr. Jerry J. Kartzinel, and Dr. James A. Neubrander, who have treated thousands of individuals with ASD.

"This is a tremendous opportunity for teachers, administrators, and all staff to attend the 2011 event featuring the top names in autism.

Our 30 speakers and panelists include physicians, behaviorists, educators, researchers, speech pathologists, developmental specialists, psychologists, scientists, dietitians, attorneys, siblings, advocates, parents, individuals on the spectrum, software technologists, professors, education consultants, plus more.

Seattle Public Schools is the largest K-12 school system in Washington state, serving more than 47,000 students in 91 schools. The Special Education department works collaboratively with school and District leaders, teachers, students, and families to provide the tools, guidance, supports, and services needed to ensure access and success for students with disabilities.

All staff and educators in the entire Seattle Public School district are invited to register for the USAAA 2011 World conference as the sessions cover topics for all individuals on the autism spectrum including special sessions addressing high function autism/Asperger syndrome, transitioning to adulthood, and much much more.

USAAA provides continuing education for all educators worldwide with special rates starting at only $95 for the entire conference.

Conference information.

To leave comments, go to our Blog.


Siblings Face High Recurrence Risk for Autism
A study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics found that infants with an older autistic sibling have a near 19 percent risk that they too will develop the disorder.The study is considered the largest autism study to follow infants for sibling recurrence.

By LARA SALAHI (@LaraSalahiABC)
August 15, 2011

autism recurrenceOne month before William and Carissa Hawn's second son was born, their first son, Logan, then 3, was diagnosed with autism.

"Logan was our first experience with autism," said William Hawn, 34, of Modesto, Calif.

"These children need careful monitoring and special surveillance [more] than what would be done at a well child visit," said Ozonoff.

But when their second son, Aaron, was born, his pediatrician told the Hawns there was a 10 percent chance that he too would develop autism.

Earlier studies are consistent with Aaron's pediatrician. Infants who have siblings with autism have a 3 to 10 percent increased risk for autism, a higher chance than the 1 percent risk among the general population.

But a new study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics now suggests the risk is higher than previously thought. The study, considered the largest autism study to follow infants for sibling recurrence, found that infants with an older autistic sibling have a near 19 percent risk that they too will develop the disorder. Full ABC News Story.

Entire Study, "Recurrence Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Baby Siblings Research Consortium Study".

To leave comments, go to our Blog.


Children With Autism, Connecting via Transit

By CHRISTINE HAUGHNEY Published: August 13, 2011

transitRavi Greene can tell you how to get anywhere in New York City by transit — like the beach, on the 6 train.

“The 6 goes elevated from Whitlock Avenue to Pelham Bay Park,” he explains. “And at Pelham Bay Park, you can transfer for a Bx29 or a Bx12 — the Bx12 to Orchard Beach.”

"“Kids with autism treat moving trains, especially ones that have limited motion like just going along the tracks, as a natural reward,” he said. “It catches their attention. Once you’ve got the child’s attention, you can do many types of teaching.”

Ravi has drafted elaborate proposals for expanded bus service in Brooklyn, and has memorized the exact date that the W train stopped running in 2010.

And he is only 5 years old.

Like many children with autism spectrum disorders, Ravi is fascinated by trains and buses, entranced by their motion and predictability. And for years, these children crowded the exhibitions of the modest New York Transit Museum, chattering about schedules and engine components and old subway maps.

“This is really their element,” said Ravi’s mother, Juliana Boehm, who brings Ravi and Oliver, his 8-year-old brother, who is also on the autism spectrum, to the museum almost weekly. “If I suggested another activity,” she added, “it may have provoked anxiety.”

Full Story.

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