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Abstracts and Learning Outcomes
Friday, October 1, 2010
7:45 a.m.
Registration and Expo open
8:45 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
Conference Opening and Welcome
Lawrence P. Kaplan, PhD

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
How Much of Autism Can Be Explained By Chronic Active Biological Processes?
Martha Herbert, MD, PhD - Medical and Research Keynote speaker
Abstract: Environmental factors affect brain development but the problem does not stop there. Environmental exposures persist as body burden, they continue to accumulate, and they have ongoing and active impacts on metabolic and immune function at the subcellular, cellular, organ and systems levels. Therefore autism is more than a developmental disorder. The chronic and persistent features of autism include many treatable features as well as a component of alteration of brain development; the relative contributions of these different aspects are virtually unevaluated, but responsiveness to treatment suggests we have been underestimating the importance of chronic and persistent contributors. It also challenges us to ask how much damage is fixed and how much the mechanisms are dynamic, even if stubborn. Understanding this aspect of autism further underscores the importance of treatment, the importance of research oriented toward environmental contributors and interventions and toward optimization of health and brain plasticity, and the allocation of major resources toward reducing unnecessary suffering. It also highlights how often we see "circular thinking" in autism, where the assumption that autism is fixed and hopeless biases research priorities and interpretations of findings toward looking for fixed impacts on early development, rather than promoting systematic examination of our assumptions and aggressive search for things that can be modulated after birth to improve outcomes.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. Identify environmental factors affecting brain development, therefore identify autism more than a developmental disorder. 2. Identify that environmental factors associated with autism show the importance of research and treatment oriented toward environmental contributors.

10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Break and Expo viewing

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
"Current Status of Research and Strategies for the Future" Panel Workshop
Panelists:
John Constantino, MD, David Geier, Mark Geier, MD, PhD, Martha Herbert, MD, PhD, Stephen Kanne, PhD
Abstract: The panelists presenting in this workshop review the current status of autism research and the strategies for the future. Each panelist presents his or her specialty. The topics include: Social Impairment and anti social behavior; New research from the field of medical genetics on the importance of targeted evaluations and treatments to improve clinical outcomes among patients diagnosed with autism including special diets, vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids, amino acids, digestive enzymes, gut treatments, glutathione, sulfation, chelation, and immunological treatments; the importance of research oriented toward environmental contributors and interventions and toward optimization of health and brain plasticity, and the allocation of major resources toward reducing unnecessary suffering.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. Outline current research involving social impairment and anti social behavior. 2. Outline research from the field of medical genetics on the importance of targeted evaluations and treatments to improve clinical outcomes among patients diagnosed with autism.

12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Lunch on your own and Expo viewing

1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
"Medical/Biomedical Cutting Edge Interventions and Treatments" Panel Workshop
Panelists: Amy Davis, MD, Phillip C. Demio, MD, Mark Geier, MD, PhD, Martha Herbert, MD, PhD
Abstract: The panelists presenting in this workshop review medical/biomedical cutting edge interventions and treatments. Each panelist presents his or her specialty. The topics include: the major biomedical treatments for autism that are supported by research, including special diets, vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids, amino acids, digestive enzymes, gut treatments, glutathione, sulfation, chelation, and immunological treatments and how to test if the treatment should be considered, and discuss how to implement the treatment. Practical approaches to implementation of treatment programs will be given, including such diets as gluten-free/casein-free, specific carbohydrate, low oxalate, pigment restriction (eg, phenols and salicylates), and others. Particular situations in which one diet would be chosen over another will be highlighted. Pitfalls must be avoided in order to foster greater ease of implementation, success (symptom control), and reduction in the complications that can occur with each diet. Digestive and gastrointestinal (GI) topics will touch upon overgrowth of yeast and other dysbioses (abnormal GI microbes), leaky gut (intestinal barrier dysfx), abdominal pain, chewing problems, swallowing difficulties, acid reflux, diarrhea, constipation, malabsorption of nutritional substances, and how these all connect to symptoms in our children and adults with spectrum disorders.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. Identify how the parts of the brain are connected and coordinated with each other and describe how one can develop measures sensitive to changes in brain and body function that could result from treatment interventions. 2. Outline new research from the field of medical genetics on the importance of targeted evaluations and treatments to improve clinical outcomes among patients diagnosed with autism. 3. Compare a variety of interventions that are supported by research.

2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Break and Expo viewing

3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
High Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome
Marlo Payne Thurman, MS,
All children on the spectrum have a variety of unique needs. However, those children with High Functioning Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome often receive the least support. Abstract is listed in the panel workshop below.
3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Theresa K. Wrangham

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
"High Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome" Panel Workshop
Panelists: Marlo Payne Thurman, MS, Theresa K. Wrangham
Abstract: This session offers practical strategies for families, educators, and professionals who care for and work with children and adults diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, high-functioning autism, and PDD-NOS. Participants will learn about the life span of individuals with AS/HFA/PDD-NOS from early childhood to adult life. Marlo Payne Thurman will present a guide to Identifying Needs, Prioritizing Interventions, and Advocating for Individuals with High Functioning Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. State that sensory states are a basis for behavior. 2. Recognize the role of arousal in learning, socialization and behavior. 3. Explain the ways to identify needs, prioritize interventions, and advocate for individuals with high functioning autism and Asperger’s Syndrome. 4. Identify the challenges and needs of high functioning populations. 5. Determine what supports and intervention areas should be addressed to create success in learning and in life.

7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Currently scheduled will be a showing of the HBO production full-length film, Temple Grandin, which
was nominated for 15 Emmy awards in 2010.

Saturday, October 2, 2010
7:45 a.m.
Registration and Expo open
9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
My experiences with Learning, Language, Sensory problems and Visual Thinking
Temple Grandin, PhD - Learning and Sensory Problems Keynote speaker
Abstract: In this presentation, Dr. Grandin will describe her experiences with autism, specifically in the areas of visual thinking, sensory problems, and difficulties with communication. After she describes her experiences, she will discuss the similarities and differences between herself and other people with an autism diagnosis. "There is probably a continuum of autism subtypes that vary in the pattern of neurological abnormality and the severity of neurological problems", explains Dr. Grandin. Dr. Grandin will also discuss how parents, teachers and all professionals who work with individuals affected by autism "must be kept engaged so that their brains can develop more normally". "They must recognize and treat sensory problems. As children get older they tend to separate into two groups. Children like me who can be "jerked" out of the autistic world and asked to pay attention, and individuals like Donna Williams and Therese Joliffe who require a gentler approach. Both types of young autistic children MUST be prevented from shutting out the world", says Dr. Grandin.
10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Break and Expo viewing

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
"Self Advocacy - Experiences, Perspectives, and Challenges" Panel Workshop
Panelists: Temple Grandin, PhD, Aaron Likens, Michael McManmon, PhD, Valerie Paradiz, PhD, Stephen Shore, EdD
Abstract: The panelists presenting in this workshop each describe his or her personal experiences with autism or Asperger’s Syndrome in the areas of visual thinking, sensory problems, difficulties with communication, socialization, work environment, and many other challenges they face each day.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. Identify individual challenges that each self-advocate faces each day. 2. Determine practical strategies in the areas of self-monitoring/self-regulation, self-advocacy, and creating safe, supportive home and school environments that foster social, development, and emotional confidence.

12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Lunch on your own and Expo viewing

1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
"Examining Promising Approaches for Educating Children with Autism to Lead Fulfilling and Productive Lives
Stephen Shore, EdD
- Behavioral/Developmental Approaches Keynote speaker
Abstract: Noting that there has been no true comparison between educational/behavioral/developmental approaches for working with children on the autism spectrum, qualitative research was initiated to investigate the following about Applied Behavioral Analysis, TEACCH, Daily Life Therapy, Miller Method, and DIR. Through written correspondence and face to face interviews, the developers of these varied approaches were queried on how they define autism, think about children with autism, and would handle carefully designed case studies representing the spectrum of autism. Some preliminary findings suggest that current definitions of autism are lacking and a more multi-dimensional approach is needed, some techniques are applicable across approaches, and a general sense that people with autism have something valuable to contribute to the community as a whole.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. List five behavioral approaches in the treatment of autism. 2. Identify techniques that are applicable across all the identified educational, behavioral, and developmental approaches presented.

2:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Break and Expo viewing

2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
"Behavioral/Developmental Approaches" Panel Workshop
Panelists: Tom Bohager, John Guercio, PhD, James W. Partington, PhD, BCBA, Jessica Royer, Stephen Shore, EdD, Todd Streff
Abstract: The panelists presenting in this workshop each describe their specialty in behavioral and developmental approaches in the treatment of autism. They include the following: ABA, TEACCH, Daily Life Therapy, Miller Method, DIR (Floortime), Verbal Behavior, and Social Skills.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. Identify different behavioral and developmental approaches in the treatment of autism. 2. State that the approaches may be applicable to one individual, but not be relevant to another individual. 3. Describe how many approaches may complement each other during intensive intervention.

4:00 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Break and Expo viewing

4:15 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
"Support Services" Panel Workshop
Panelists: Tec Chapman, Michael McManmon, PhD, Vonda Murphy, Ann Schad, Shannon Shelley
Abstract: The panelists presenting in this workshop each describe their specialty for services that are available for individuals on the autism spectrum. The topics presented include Parent mentors, Sib Shops, Residential Options, college options and transitioning into college programs, adult support groups, and governmental programs.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. List support services for individuals with autism related disorders including parent mentors, Sib Shops, residential options, college options and transitioning into college programs, and governmental programs. 2. Compare different support groups including Adults with Asperger’s Syndrome and parental support groups.

7:00 p.m. - TBD
Sunday, October 3, 2010
7:45 a.m.
Registration and Expo open

8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.
"Sibling Panel Discussion"™ - Siblings of individuals on the autism spectrum will share their experiences and answer questions.
The siblings of individuals on the autism spectrum will share their experiences and answer questions. Siblings of children with autism carry the burden of extra responsibility and worry about their the future. They also develop compassion and family love. Autism creates an enormous responsibility on siblings, according to educators, therapists and a dozen scientific studies. Autistic children can have raging tantrums, which can be frightening or embarrassing to siblings.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. Identify ways that siblings of autistic children may cope in different settings at home, shopping, at a restaurant or at school. 2. Determine when familial problems regarding equal attention exist.

9:30 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.
Break and Expo viewing

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Seven Principles of Advocacy: Standing Up for Your Child with Autism
Areva D. Martin, Esq. - Advocacy Keynote speaker
Abstract: Trying to access services for her son convinced Areva, a Harvard-trained attorney and mom, that parents needed a comprehensive go-to book that would save them months of wasted time and years of frustration. The book, The Everyday Advocate: Standing Up for Your Child with Autism, contains the The Seven Principles of Advocacy which will be discussed in this presentation. The Seven Principles are as follows: Take Responsibility, Learn, Think Critically, Speak with Authority, Document, Collaborate and Educate. Also discussed will be the importance on parents ascertaining what's best for their child in terms of treatment and therapy as well as finding the right educational system for their child's special needs. Areva will share the stories of other parents to show how being an advocate can make an impact.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. List The Seven Principles of Advocacy. 2. Determine what's best for an autistic individual in terms of treatment, therapy, and education.

10:45 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Break and Expo viewing

11:15 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
"Adjunct Therapies" Panel Workshop
Panelists: Dan Copes, Elaine Hall, Cheryl Klohr, Jenie Nowak, Ruth Ann Rehfeldt
Abstract: The panelists presenting in this workshop each describe their specialty for adjunct therapies and interventions in the treatment of autism spectrum disorders. The topics presented include Speech, OT, Sensory Integration, Augmentative Communication, PECS, SCERTS, Auditory Integration, The Miracle Project, plus more.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. Identify adjunct therapies available in the treatment of autism. 2. Explain how different adjunct therapies may complement each other during intensive intervention. 3. Explain how each therapy may work independently of another. 4. State that adjunct therapies can be effective for one individual, but not for another.

12:45 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Lunch on your own and Expo viewing

1:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
"Bringing it all together, Parent and Practitioner" Panel Workshop
Panelists: Phillip C. Demio, MD, Jason Eden, Kristin Selby Gonzalez, John Guerico, PhD, Elaine Hall, Areva Martin, Esq.
Abstract: Leading autism experts who are parents of children with autism will share in their personal experiences in the areas of medical/biomedical treatments, behavioral/developmental interventions, diet and nutritional interventions, advocacy, adjunct therapies, and family issues.

Learning Outcomes: The participant will be able to: 1. Identify common obstacles faced by parents of children with autism. 2. Describe three examples of biomedical, behavioral and nutritional interventions that have been successfully implemented by this panel of professionals.

3:15 p.m.
Conference concludes.
US Autism & Asperger Association reserves the right to make any necessary changes to this program. Every effort will be made to keep presentations and speakers as represented. However, unforeseen circumstances may result in the substitution of a presentation topic or speaker. All announcements of any changes will be made on this site or in our weekly newsletter. Click here to subscribe to our complimentary USAAA WeeklyNews email newsletter.
 
 

 

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